Mansfield park

Mansfield Park Quotes

  • A fondness for reading, properly directed, must be an education in itself.

  • An engaged woman is always more agreeable than a disengaged. She is satisfied with herself. Her cares are over, and she may exert all her powers of pleasing without suspicion. All is safe with a lady engaged; no harm can be done.

  • A watch is always too fast or too slow. I cannot be dictated to by a watch.

  • Children of the same family, the same blood, with the same first associations and habits, have some means of enjoyment in their power, which no subsequent connections can supply; and it must be by a long and unnatural estrangement, by a divorce which no subsequent connection can justify, if such precious remains of the earliest attachments are ever entirely outlived.

  • Everybody likes to go their own way - €“to choose their own time and manner of devotion.

  • Every moment has its pleasures and its hope.

  • He had suffered, and he had learnt to think, two advantages that he had never known before.

  • Human nature needs more lessons than a weekly sermon can convey.

  • I am very strong. Nothing ever fatigues me, but doing what I do not like.

  • I do not pretend to set people right, but I do see that they are often wrong.

  • If any one faculty of our nature may be called more wonderful than the rest, I do think it is memory. There seems something more speakingly incomprehensible in the powers, the failures, the inequalities of memory, than in any other of our intelligences. The memory is sometimes so retentive, so serviceable, so obedient; at others, so bewildered and so weak; and at others again, so tyrannic, so beyond control! We are, to be sure, a miracle every way; but our powers of recollecting and of forgetting do seem peculiarly past finding out.

  • I pay very little regard to what any young person says on the subject of marriage. If they profess a disinclination for it, I only set it down that they have not yet seen the right person.

  • Is there not something wanted in our language - a something between compliments and - and love - to suit the sort of friendly acquaintance we have had together?

  • It raises my spleen more than any thing, to have the pretence of being asked, of being given a choice, and at the same time addressed in such a way as to oblige one to do the very thing - whatever it be!

  • I was so anxious to do what is right that I forgot to do what is right.

  • Let us have the luxury of silence.

  • Life seems nothing more than a quick succession of busy nothings.

  • None but a woman can teach the science of herself.

  • She was feeling, thinking, trembling about everything; agitated, happy, miserable, infinitely obliged, absolutely angry.

  • The enthusiasm of a woman's love is even beyond the biographer's.