Middlemarch

Middlemarch Quotes

  • A good wife - €”a good unworldly woman €”may really help a man, and keep him more independent.

  • A human being in this aged nation of ours is a very wonderful hole, the slow creation of long interchanging influences; and charm is a result of two such wholes, the one loving and the one loved.

  • A man conscious of enthusiasm for worthy aims is sustained under petty hostilities by the memory of great workers who had to fight their way not without wounds, and who hover in his mind as patron saints, invisibly helping.

  • A man's mind must be continually expanding and shrinking between the whole human horizon and the horizon of an object-glass.

  • A medical man likes to make psychological observations, and sometimes in the pursuit of such studies is too easily tempted into momentous prophecy which life and death easily set at nought.

  • Among all forms of mistake, prophecy is the most gratuitous.

  • A prig is a fellow who is always making you a present of his opinions.

  • A woman dictates before marriage in order that she may have an appetite for submission afterwards.

  • Blameless people are always the most exasperating.

  • Character is not cut in marble - it is not something solid and unalterable. It is something living and changing, and may become diseased as our bodies do.

  • Destiny stands by sarcastic with our dramatis personae folded in her hand.

  • Dogma gives a charter to mistake, but the very breath of science is a contest with mistake, and must keep the conscience alive.

  • Each position has its corresponding duties.

  • Everybody liked better to conjecture how the thing was, than simply to know it; for conjecture soon became more confident than knowledge, and had a more liberal allowance for the incompatible.

  • Every limit is a beginning as well as an ending.

  • Falsehood is so easy, truth so difficult. Examine your words well, and you will find that even when you have no motive to be false, it is a very hard thing to say the exact truth, even about your own immediate feelings - much harder than to say something fine about them which is not the exact truth.

  • Few things hold the perception more thoroughly captive than anxiety about what we have got to say

  • For in the multitude of middle-aged men who go about their vocations in a daily course determined for them much in the same way as the tie of their cravats, there is always a good number who once meant to shape their own deeds and alter the world a little. The story of their coming to be shapen after the average and fit to be packed by the gross, is hardly ever told even in their consciousness; for perhaps their ardour in generous unpaid toil cooled as imperceptibly as the ardour of other youthful loves, till one day their earlier self walked like a ghost in its old home and made the new furniture ghastly.

  • For the egoism which enters into our theories does not affect their sincerity; rather, the more our egoism is satisfied, the more robust is our belief.

  • For we all of us, grave or light, get our thoughts entangled in metaphors, and act fatally on the strength of them.