Oliver twist

Oliver Twist Quotes

  • Alas ! How few of Nature's faces are left alone to gladden us with their beauty ! The cares, and sorrows, and the hungerings, of the world, change them as they change hearts; and it is only when those passions sleep, and have lost their hold for ever, that the troubled clouds pass off, and leave Heaven's surface clear.

  • An event begins to be forgotten, as most affairs are, when wonder, having no fresh food to support it, dies away of itself.

  • Crime, like death, is not confined to the old and withered alone. The youngest amd fairest are too often its chosen victims.

  • Every man's his own friend. He hasn't as good a one as himself anywhere.

  • How slight a thing will disturb the equanimity of our frail minds!

  • I confess I have yet to learn that a lesson of the purest good may not be drawn from the vilest evil.

  • If an enthusiastic, ardent, and ambitous man marry a wife on whose name there is a stain, which, though it originate in no fault of hers, may be visited by cold and sordid people upon her, and upon his children also: and, in exact proportion to his success in the world, be cast in his teeth, and made the subject of sneers against him: he may-no matter how generous and good his nature- one day repent of the connection he formed in early life; and she may have the pain and torture of knowing that he does so.

  • It is a pleasant world we live in. There are bad people in it, but if there were no bad people, there would be no good lawyers.

  • My heart is set, as firmly as ever heart of man was set on woman. I have no thought, no view, no hope, in life beyond her.

  • Some conjurers say that number three is the magic number, and some say number seven. It's neither my friend, neither. It's number one.

  • Sudden shifts and changes are no bad preparation for political life.

  • The hardest and best-borne trials are those which are never chronicled in any earthly record, and are suffered every day!

  • There are some promotions in life, which, independent of the more substantial rewards they offer, acquire peculiar value and dignity from the coats and waistcoats connected with them. A field-marshal has his uniform; a bishop his silk apron; a counsellor his silk gown; a beadle his cocked hat. Strip the bishop of his apron, or the beadle of his hat and lace; what are they? Men. Mere men. Dignity, and even holiness too, sometimes, are more questions of coat and waistcoat than some people imagine.

  • The sun, the bright sun, that brings back, not light alone, but new life, and hope, and freshness to man - burst upon the crowded city in clear and radiant glory. Through costly - coloured glass and paper - mended window, through cathedral dome and rotten crevice, it shed its equal ray.

  • To this it must be added, that life in a wig is to a large class of people much more terrifying and impressive than life with its own head of hair.

  • Violent deeds live after men upon the earth, and traces of war and bloodshed will survive in mournful shapes long after those who worked the desolation are but atoms of earth themselves.

  • When a man's his own enemy, it's only because he's too much his own friend; not because he's careful for everybody but himself.

  • Women can always put things in fewest words. Except when it's blowing up; and then they lengthens it out.